Math (Yes Math) is Racist



In this amazing world that we live in, it is literally impossible to find something, anything that is not considered racist. Whether it’s COVID, the only virus known to man that was carefully created by Chinese mad scientists to seek out and disproportionately impact black people over whites OR my personal favorite, “White Fragility” which states that white kids are born racist simply because they are born white.

It’s been hammered into our heads for many, many years that kids must go to college if they stand a modicum of success in life. Through my own personal experiences I don’t believe this to be entirely true, at least not for me. It may have taken me a bit longer than some others but a guy like me should not be successful, at least in the eyes of our society. When you take a step back and try to digest all of the crap these Liberal colleges and college professors are trying to cram down students throats, it’s quite sickening.

Math professors at top college/universities, including Harvard, Univ. of IL and Brooklyn College, have pontificated that mathematics is rooted in “white supremacist patriarchy” and “white social construct”. A professor at Brooklyn College, Laurie Rubel, said “the idea of math being culturally neutral is a “myth”, because 2+2=4 “reeks of white supremacist patriarchy”. After all these years, I thought 2+2=4, nothing more or nothing less. However, it does beg the question, is math considered “non-racist” if the mathematical equation were 2-2=0?

This page, “Math (Yes Math is Racist)” is a culmination of recent and past articles written and published by Campus Reform. Enjoy!


Math education prof: 2+2 = 4 ‘trope’ ‘reeks of white supremacy patriarchy’

Ben Zeisloft Pennsylvania Senior Campus Correspondent

Math professors and educators at leading American universities have taken to Twitter and to debate whether math is racist.

Some asserted that objective mathematics is rooted in “white supremacist patriarchy” and white social constructs. “People say it’s subjectivism to ask if math is Western. I don’t get that.”    Tweet This

The debate itself was rooted in George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, in which citizens of a fictional totalitarian state believe that 2 plus 2 equals 5 as a result of government propaganda.

Laurie Rubel, who teaches math education at Brooklyn College, says that the idea of math being cultural neutral is a “myth,” and that asking whether 2 plus 2 equals 4 “reeks of white supremacist patriarchy.”

“Y’all must know that the idea that math is objective or neutral IS A MYTH,” she tweeted.

[RELATED: Math is ‘unjust and grounded in discrimination,’ educators moan]

Spencer Bagley, a math professor at Westminster College in Pennsylvania, retweeted Rubel’s assertion.

The radical left will stop at nothing to intimidate conservative students on college campuses. You can help expose them. Find out more »

Rochelle Gutierrez, who teaches “Sociopolitical Perspectives on Mathematics and Science Education” at the University of Illinois, responded o a tweet from a former educator claiming that the U.S. “colonizes” math. 

“By now it is well known, for example, that other cultures were using the theorem we call Pythagorean, yet we still refer to it with this name. This is colonization and erasure,” the tweet from the former educator read. 

Gutierrez responded with, YES! This attends to the Cultures/Histories dimension of RM (addressing Western/Eurocentric maths). And, we also want to attend to the Living Practice dimension (which is more about imagining a version that builds upon ancestral knowings, but does not yet exist).”

[RELATED: Prof: Algebra, geometry perpetuate white privilege]

Kareem Carr, a Ph.D. student at Harvard University, weighed in with, “People say it’s subjectivism to ask if math is Western. I don’t get that. It’s an objective fact that some groups were more involved in the creation of modern math than others. They may have been *trying* to make it objective but it’s not stupid to ask if they actually succeeded!”


Math is ‘unjust and grounded in discrimination,’ educators moan

Toni Airaksinen Columnist at PJ Media

  • Two national organizations of math teachers are on a mission to prove that math education is “unjust and grounded in a legacy of institutional discrimination.”
  • In a joint statement, the groups complain that making students “master the basics” leads to “segregation and separation,” and call on math instructors to adopt a “social justice stance” in the classroom.

Two national mathematics organizations are on a mission to prove that math education is “unjust and grounded in a legacy of institutional discrimination.”

The National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) and TODOS: Mathematics for All “ratify social justice as a key priority in the access to, engagement with, and advancement in mathematics education for our country’s youth,” the groups declared last year in a joint statement, elaborating that “a social justice stance interrogates and challenges the roles power, privilege, and oppression play in the current unjust system of mathematics education—and in society as a whole.”Math has “been used to educate children into different societal roles such as leadership/ruling class.”   

Next month, NCSM and TODOS, along with a few other membership societies for math teachers, will host a free webinar drawing upon the principals noted in their joint statement, inviting any interested members of the public to join in hearing “A Call for a Collective Action to Develop Awareness: Equity and Social Justice in Mathematics Education.”

[RELATED: Teachers learn to use math as Trojan horse for social justice]

The president of NCSM, Connie Schrock, is a math professor at Emporia State University, and multiple professors serve on the board of TODOS.

While the organizations hope that math can be used as a tool for social justice in the future, they also believe that math has historically perpetuated “segregation and separation,” asserting in their joint statement that “mathematics achievement, often measured by standardized tests, has been used as a gatekeeping tool to sort and rank students by race, class, and gender starting in elementary school.”

Citing the practice of “tracking,” in which pupils are sorted by academic ability into groups for certain classes, NCSM and TODOS argue that “historically, mathematics and the perceived ability to learn mathematics have been used to educate children into different societal roles such as leadership/ruling class and labor/working class leading to segregation and separation.”

[RELATED: Michigan colleges drops math, considers diversity course instead]

The radical left will stop at nothing to intimidate conservative students on college campuses. You can help expose them. Find out more »

“In practice, children placed in ‘low’ groups experience mathematics as an isolating act consisting of fact-driven low cognitive demand tasks and an absence of mathematics discourse opportunities,” the statement contends, attributing the condition to “a pervasive misguided belief that students must ‘master the basics’ prior to engaging with complex problems [sic] solving.”

The groups also bemoan the “white and middle class” workforce of math teachers, fretting that it may not appropriately “reflect” the demographics of the communities in which they teach, such as immigrant or racial minority communities.

Social justice could be the key to solving these issues, they say, calling on math teachers to assume a “social justice stance” that “challenges the roles power, privilege, and oppression play in the current unjust system of mathematics.”

[RELATED: Prof finds ‘no evidence’ sexism is behind gender gap in STEM]

NCSM and TODOS even provided detailed strategies that math teachers can use to promote social justice, such as advocating for increased “recruitment and retention of math teachers from historically marginalized groups” and challenging “individual and societal beliefs underlying the deficit views about mathematics learning and children, with specific attention to race/ethnicity, class, gender, culture, and language.”

But social justice work is nothing without accountability, they warn, declaring that “we must hold the profession and our organizations accountable to making a just and equitable mathematics education a sustainable reality.”